“No one has perfect mental health.”


May is National Mental Health Awareness Month

Who is your shoulder to cry on, your sounding board, your listening ear? We all have experiences every day that can impact our emotional well-being. It’s important to have someone you can turn to when the going gets rough — whether it’s a family member, a significant other, a friend or a therapist.


“When we go through difficulties in life, it’s natural to want support and someone to talk to,” says Synchronous Health Specialist Nadia Aquino. “Working one-on-one with a professional counselor can help you find positive ways of dealing with the stresses of daily life.”


Counseling can help you:

  • Cultivate self-confidence

  • Learn about healthy/unhealthy habits and patterns

  • Set goals

  • Create healthy boundaries

Studies show just how effective counseling can be; for example, people who receive therapy fare better on average than 79% of people who don’t seek help. That means they take fewer medicines, experience less chronic pain and anxiety, and have an overall improved quality of life.


“Counseling is an amazing resource for developing a relationship with yourself,” says Synchronous Health Specialist Edlin Gutierrez.


“It can also be helpful to journal throughout the course of counseling as a way to document personal growth and insights developed,” Gutierrez continues. “It’s important to remember that no one has perfect mental health. We all have room to grow.”


If you could use some support in combatting stress or would just like someone to talk to, the Connect with Karla team is ready to serve you. To learn more and connect with a specialist, visit sync.health/mnps or call 615-258-6654. With Connect with Karla, you can meet with a therapist via videoconference from the comfort of your home — at no cost to you.


Synchronous Health will host a webinar where specialists will discuss the Benefits & Barriers to Counseling and answer questions live on May 25 at 4:15 p.m.


 

Sources: John Hopkins Medicine; National Register of Health Services/Harvard University; PositivePsychology.com